The Basement

Simply Live

moon dust in your lungs
stars in your eyes

you are a child of the cosmos
and ruler of the skies

for em (via trenzalours)

(via sav3mys0ul)

The Upside

The Upside

at Wade County

at Wade County

teded:

A Guide to the Energy of the Earth

Energy moves in and out of Earth’s physical systems, and during any energy transfer between them, some energy is lost to the surroundings as heat, light, sound, vibration, or movement.

Our planet’s energy comes from internal and external sources. Geothermal energy from radioactive isotopes and rotational energy from the spinning of the Earth are internal sources of energy, while the Sun is the major external source, driving certain systems, like our weather and our climate.

Sunlight warms the surface and atmosphere in varying amounts, and this causes convection, producing winds and influencing ocean currents. Infrared radiation, radiating out from the warmed surface of the Earth, gets trapped by greenhouse gases and further affects the energy flow.

From the TED-Ed Lesson A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

Animation by Marc Christoforidis

(via discoverynews)

Magic Hour

Magic Hour

photojojo:

Each and every day, Central American youth embark on a harrowing journey north to reach the United States.

Los Angeles Times staff photographer Don Bartletti chronicled the story of Enrique, a teenager from Honduras who was heading north in search of his mother. See the rest of Bartletti’s Pulitzer Prize-winning series below.

The Journey From Central America to the United States in Photos

via The Click

salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

(via skeletales)